Find out more about the Geist Touring 65 from 2006 in the Practical Motorhome review

Design

In terms of appearance, the Geist stands out, looking sleek and sharp thanks to its colour-coded side skirts and bumper. Add in the smart graphics and stylish alloy wheels and the Geist definitely has its share of glamour.

The gas lockers on the Geist ’vans is mounted low down, which we liked because the heavy bottles do not need to be lifted too high.

The Geist has stylish lighting integrated into the top of its door frame. As well as looking great, it also lights up the door, which is just what you need when you are fumbling with your door keys on a dark night. Gimmicky perhaps, but we rather like the spyhole in the door, too, which lets you see who is knocking on your door.

Inside, the Geist does a good job of balancing cosy and cool. There’s a very pale wood finish and light coloured surfaces to brighten their interiors, and a pair of three-point seat belts for both rear passengers adds safety to svelte. Removable carpets are standard.

On the road

The current Fiat Ducato base vehicle – the bedrock of the motorhome market since it was launched in 2003 – is falling off the pace. Still, there are no major issues with this industry favourite – you get electric windows and mirrors, although the omission of ABS braking and stability control looks poor compared to the Renault Master. The 2.3JTD diesel is a good unit – easily capable of lugging this van around.

Lounging & dining

Geist has fitted a half-dinette with a two-seater sofa facing the end of the table. This provides lounging space and a dining area for four if you swivel the cab seats. This gives access to the table for a minimum of four, or maybe five, diners and comfortable lounging space for four. A slide-out dining table extends its length and allows six people to sit down to eat.

The Geist has standard Fiat cab seats, too, but they have been improved with the addition of extra support around the shoulders and headrest, making them more comfortable for use in the evening than the standard ones.

The side-facing seats have a very short backrest, but the seat base is long and offers good under-thigh support.

Kitchen

The Geist offers only three gas burners and no electronic ignition in its central L-shaped kitchen.

Food preparation space is very limited unless the sink and hob cover is used. The corner void between hob and sink offers a limited amount of worktop space.

There are generous storage areas, low down, while there’s a familiar Dometic fridge with a freezer compartment inside opposite, above a big locker.

Sleeping

Fixed beds guarantee a certain level of comfort thanks to a dedicated mattress which does not have to double as a seat base. The Geist uses a ‘split’ mattresses to ease access to the under-bed storage area, but it’s firm and pocket-sprung and the split does not affect your comfort. The Elnagh and Adria have one-piece mattresses with covers that match the rest of the interior.

There are reading lights, but it’s a pity there’s nowhere to put your glasses, books or other bedtime bits and pieces.
The dinette bed was simple to assemble, despite the need to fit two small legs to a slide-out bed base. The cushion arrangement was obvious and the resultant bed very flat.

The cab curtain could do with being lined to keep light out (and privacy in) more effectively.

Washroom

The Geist boasts loads of lighting and plenty of storage space. We have mixed feelings about the mains socket in the washroom, though. However, it is mounted sufficiently high that it would be unlikely to get splashed – and it is handy for hair drying in front of the mirror.

Storage

The Geist does a great job of making its available storage space more accessible. By moving the Truma boiler to the back of the bed space, the front area can be easily reached when the bed base is lifted, as well as through the exterior locker door.

There’s special provision for a television, too, but perhaps more useful are the coat hooks inside the door.

Technical specs

Sleeps4
Travel seats4
MTPLM3500kg
Payload741kg
Length6.77m22′3″
Width2.32m7′7″
Height2.78m9′1″
Waste water100L
External Options
Aluminium sidewalls, Awning light
Kitchen Equipment
Dometic Fridge, 3-burner gas hob
Washroom
Thetford C-250 toilet, Separate shower cubicle
Heating
Truma Electric/Gas Blown air heater, Truma Electric/Gas water heater

Verdict

Good build quality and stylish design mean that this Geist Touring 65 is worthy of consideration.

Conclusion

Pros

  • Sleek, stylish exterior
  • Pleasant, British-feeling interior
  • Nicely constructed

Cons

  • Its price
  • Ducato base vehicle beginning to feel old
Share with friends

Follow us on

Most recent motorhome reviews

The Practical Motorhome Pilote Pacific P650U Sensation review – 1 - The Pilote Pacific P650U Sensation is a two-berth with four belted travel seats and an MTPLM of 3500kg (© Peter Baber/Practical Motorhome)
The Practical Motorhome Lunar Roadstar EL review – 1 - The Lunar Roadstar EL rides on the very manoeuvrable Renault Master and is powered by a 2.3-litre, Euro 6-compliant, turbodiesel engine with 128bhp (© Practical Motorhome)
The Practical Motorhome Bailey Autograph 68-2 review – 1 - This rear-lounge, 3500kg ’van is a pretty manageable 6.79m long – the wind-out awning is standard, too (© Practical Motorhome)

Tribute 680

£41,087OTR

The Practical Motorhome Tribute 680 review – 1 - The XL LWB Fiat Ducato-based Tribute 680 has a 25-litre underslung gas tank (© Practical Motorhome)
The Practical Motorhome Adria Sonic Supreme I 810 SC review – 1 - The 2017-season Adria Sonic Supreme I 810 SC is priced from £86,990 OTR, £98,739 as tested (© Practical Motorhome)
The Practical Motorhome Swift Rio 340 Black Edition review – 1 - Black cab detailing has been a hit in the Bolero and Kon-Tiki ranges, and has now come to the Rio (© Practical Motorhome)