Andrew McPhee

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The Practical Motorhome Horizons Unlimited Cavarno 2 review

Design

The Cavarno has an upmarket appearance, thanks to its branded GRP window surrounds and five-spoke alloys. The Cavarno has a retro-fitted high-top, which, in the unlikely event of the vehicle rolling, won’t have the same level of protection as factory high-tops used by some rivals. It also has a tidy, recessed awning.
Water tanks aren’t winterised, although they are an option. The Duetto has a neat GRP spoiler in front of its Heki roof light, while the Provence’s roof can take a roof rack (optional).
Side entrance is easy and the Cavarno offers an (optional) electric step. At the rear, there’s a tailgate at the rear (our test model had ‘barn’ doors, but this is not standard, so we’ve photographed a similar tailgate model), so there’s a double-glazed caravan window with a blind, but it’s a bit more work if you choose to come and go via the back door.
The driver’s seat is adjustable, but both cab seats are a little high for anyone over 6ft tall, due to the retro-fitted swivel plates.
The rear seats have firm upholstery, raked back cushions and headrests for comfort on long journeys.
Rear-wheel drive is available in the Cavarno at no extra cost, at the expense of the rear underfloor storage, but its option of four-wheel drive is almost unique among motorhomes and will appeal in terms of handling. The Cavarno’s size makes it easy to park and manoeuvre, too.

On the road

Once, the VW Transporter would have easily have been the best-driving base for a motorhome, thanks to its car-like feel and specification, but the current Ford Transit base has come a long way. It has a dashboard-mounted gear stick and a high cab specification: you get a leather steering wheel, heated windscreen and cruise control, as well as plenty of storage space, including bottle and cup holders either side.
The driver’s seat is adjustable, but both cab seats are a little high for anyone over 6ft tall, due to the retro-fitted swivel plates.
The rear seats have firm upholstery, raked back cushions and headrests for comfort on long journeys.
Rear-wheel drive is available in the Cavarno at no extra cost, at the expense of the rear underfloor storage, but its option of four-wheel drive is almost unique among motorhomes and will appeal in terms of handling. The Cavarno’s size makes it easy to park and manoeuvre, too.

Lounging & dining

The Cavarno looks plush with its leather/Alcantara trim but this is an expensive option at more than £1400. However, its beautifully crafted, oak-edged furniture comes as standard (it is reminiscent of classic Auto-Sleepers construction). The moulded GRP window surrounds and suede-effect roof lining further the impression of quality and this motorhome feels like a class act.
In simplest form, this ’van provides four-seater lounges with twin dinettes. The Cavarno has a single-leg table, with coffee table option, that sits between the seats and helps make up the optional double bed. Twin swivel seats make up the beds, but engaging the driver’s swivel seats and to make the bed was rather involved.
The back cushions don’t have fixing points: there’s a sturdy backrest which takes up most of the overhead locker.

Kitchen

The Cavarno has a full-size cooker, with a glass sink top (but no drainer). It’s not a huge kitchen, but the worktop by the hob, and the fold-down board across the back of the ’van, make it very useable, considering how confined the space is. Storage is pretty much par for the course in a camper this size – there’s a narrow locker between the fridge and cooker and two lockers above the kitchen.

Sleeping

The Cavarno has a twin single bed as standard but it can also convert into a double bed.
The beds are flat and long, but it takes patience to manoeuvre the seat backs right down to create the bed. When its beds are down, you’ll find two sturdy, folding shelves below the travel headrests, so you can read the morning papers in bed.

Washroom

The Cavarno punches above its weight in what is, for all campers, the biggest compromise area. This model has an optional shower pack with a folding acrylic door that covers the entrance door and a neat toilet-roll cover that winds the paper in when you push it down.
The moulded GRP walls and shower tray are solid and are very impressively built. There is a shower room space of 50 x 73cm once the toilet has been swivelled out of the way. For normal washing, however, because the tap-cum-shower head is not positioned over the sink, you have to fill the basin first.
The washroom door opens towards the front to accommodate the shower door. It is not very convenient for access, but it does at least provide some modesty for emerging occupants.

Storage

Front-wheel drive Cavarnos have clear storage areas for pitching kit (the rear underfloor space). If you opt for a rear-wheel drive version, you’ll have to give up this storage area.
A similar situation arises with the wardrobe: the Cavarno sacrifices hanging height for shelves above. There’s a good-sized locker over the cab for bedding and other such items. There’s access to the bed box, but the offside space houses electrics and the water heater.
Both the Provence and the Duetto have lockable seat-base stores in the passenger seat.
Apart from the Lezan, each ‘van has two overhead lockers but these are shallow (the Duetto’s would only hold books and DVDs).
In the kitchen, slide-out shelves for cans are a useful addition.

Technical specs

Sleeps2
Travel seats4
MTPLM3000kg
Payload460kg
Length5.9m19′4″
Width1.99m6′6″
Height2.59m8′6″
Waste water30L
Kitchen Equipment
4-burner gas hob, Oven, Separate grill
Washroom
Thetford C-250 toilet
Heating
Truma Electric/Gas water heater, Whale blown air space heater

Verdict

The Cavarno will bring great pride of ownership and is a good passenger vehicle, at less than 5m long.

Conclusion

Pros

  • Superb craftsmanship; clever use of a small space

Cons

  • Beds are awkward to make if you need them to be longer than 6ft
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