Andrew McPhee

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Get inside the Bilbo's Design Lezan in the Practical Motorhome review

Design

The Lezan has a good level of insulation and blown-air diesel heating. Bilbo’s claims superior sound insulation qualities for the Lezan’s closed-cell foam, but its glass windows may suffer from condensation in cold weather. The water tanks aren’t winterised, but the fresh tank is internal.

On the road

The VW-based Bilbo’s has a car-like feel, is relaxing to drive and a high specification. You get an adjustable steering wheel, two slide-out cup holders and twin airbags with the option of side airbags. Both cab seats have twin armrests, rake and lumbar adjustment, and factory-fitted swivel mechanisms, so headroom is not an issue, and the rear seats have been crash-tested.
Through-view is fair, but you don’t get a heated rear screens (although you do get a rear wiper).
The Duetto has the most engine power and torque,
and its rear-wheel drive will be favoured by some for the difference in handling.
Rear-wheel drive is available in the Cavarno at no extra cost, at the expense of the rear underfloor storage, but its option of four-wheel drive is almost unique among motorhomes and will appeal in terms of handling.

Lounging & dining

The interior is geared towards functionality, with automotive-style, hard-wearing seat fabrics and tough, laminated locker construction that looks more damp-resistant than that of many rivals. The ambience is cold, but for families and outdoor enthusiasts – walkers, mountain bikers and surfers – practical concerns will outweigh this. In general, the Lezan’s interior will need no more care than a wipe down with a damp cloth, though its carpet-lined roof and fabric-trimmed door panels don’t quite fit with this ethos.
Twin swivel seats make up the beds. In simplest form, these provide four-seater loungers with twin dinettes. There are two tables as standard, and the offside dinette can be left made up for ease of passage through the side door, or it can be converted into a sofa. The back cushions don’t have fixing points: the cushions are small and neat, with a cushion to replace the lowered travel seat back. Engaging the driver’s swivel seats and subsequent bed-making can be fairly laborious.

Kitchen

The Lezan uses a Waeco compressor fridge, which runs from 12V power only – thankfully, there is an ample supply from its 135Ah leisure battery. This confirms its outdoor credentials: park at the beach/hillside, go for a swim/walk/ride and come back to the ‘van for a cold drink and a sandwich.
There are only two gas burners and a large sink with no drainer (both beneath a hefty glass cover). However, there is a substantial worktop (44 x 64cm) above the fridge. Combined with the small grill, there’s potential for preparing simple meals, but other rivals offer more.

Sleeping

The Lezan comes with twin singles as standard but there’s a double-bed option. It has fairly level beds, with the flat, firm cushions being comfortable. However, the sleeper’s feet rest on the cab seats, which slope downwards to the rear.

Washroom

The Lezan takes a different approach to many competitors: a top-of-the range bench toilet and a tiny hand-washing sink are all that’s provided, although you can opt for a shower attachment for the tap (though this is meant for outdoor use). With the sturdy toilet seat cover in place, and a space-saving pleated curtain, it makes a useful dressing area and a great place to de-tog after outdoor activities, because the wardrobe is close at hand.

Storage

The open shelving at the back of the Lezan, or its nearside seat base, could prove useful for storing pitching-up equipment, such as 240V cables and so on.
The wardrobe only allows hanging width for a couple of long items, with shelving to the side.
In the kitchen, there are two large, eye-level cupboards, while slide-out shelves for cans are a useful addition.

Technical specs

Sleeps2
Travel seats4
MTPLM3000kg
Payload680kg
Length2.04m6′8″
Width5.29m17′4″
Height2.46m8′1″
Waste water36L
Kitchen Equipment
Waeco Compressor Fridge, 2-burner gas hob, Combined Oven/Grill
Washroom
Thetford C-250 toilet
Heating
Webasto water/space heater

Verdict

For outdoor pursuits, the Lezan is an obvious choice and a great daily driver. Its Spartan trim is not for everyone, though.

Conclusion

Pros

  • Terrific vehicle to drive, with a durable finish

Cons

  • Lacks the domestic feel of a motorhome
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