Benjamin Davies

See other Blog articles filed in ‘Editor's Blog’ written by Benjamin Davies
   
Our Gentleman Jack Bancroft is an irredeemable motorcaravaning enthusiast. His family have been camping, caravanning and motorcaravanning since 1928. Jack and his wife Flora are now on their tenth motorhome, a 2003 Auto-Sleeper Pollensa on a Ford Transit base. They have toured extensively at home and abroad, including a period of full-timing. Here, Jack answers your motorcaravanning queries:

Gentleman JackOur Gentleman Jack Bancroft is an irredeemable motorcaravaning enthusiast. His family have been camping, caravanning and motorcaravanning since 1928. Jack and his wife Flora are now on their tenth motorhome, a 2003 Auto-Sleeper Pollensa on a Ford Transit base. They have toured extensively at home and abroad, including a period of full-timing. Here, Jack answers your motorcaravanning queries:

 

Q: Sleuth required: would you do a bit of digging please? I have an ’09 plate Swift Bolero. Since purchase (at 6 months old) the habitation controls and functions ‘did their own thing’. After lots of returns to the dealer, it transpires that the fault is the habitation fuse-box system, made in Italy by Nordica Electronica.

 

The unit has been changed once and although better, it’s still faulty. Internet investigation suggests this is not a new or uncommon problem. Do you think Swift will extend the guarantee on this component?

 

Also, as this is a known fault, should the dealer have sold the motorhome on? 

Ray Weinstein

Via email

 

A: How frustrating to spend all that money and have unreliable electrics. Unfortunately I can’t give a definitive answer on what Swift should do after the warranty expires, or on whether the dealer should have sold it on. However, my opinion is that if the unit has been repaired and is now satisfactory, both have honoured the warranty. If it doesn’t work correctly, ask your dealer to look again at it. I assume that you have taken over the Supercare warranty and have abided by its conditions such as having an annual inspection at an approved workshop and so forth.

 

Other readers have reported problems with Nordelettronica habitation consumer units but most have been repaired or upgraded, even if it took two or three goes. Although the control panel was thought to be at fault, most said that it was actually the leisure battery charger or the consumer unit causing problems.

 

You may wish to raise this with Swift via its own social media site www.swift-talk.co.uk or via www.motorhomefacts.com, where Swift tries to answer queries. It may be that your dealer isn’t aware of the latest recalls or modifications. Once the warranty expires, paying someone like Diamond Dave to take a look may well be your best way forward.

 

 

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